Author Archives: Lou Catherine Cornum

A Day at the Caribbean Digital Conference

I wanted to pull together some of my thoughts on the Caribbean Digital II Conference (December 4, 2015 at Columbia University), hobbled together from notes I took on my phone and recollection, and connect them to some of the ideas

A Day at the Caribbean Digital Conference

I wanted to pull together some of my thoughts on the Caribbean Digital II Conference (December 4, 2015 at Columbia University), hobbled together from notes I took on my phone and recollection, and connect them to some of the ideas

Resource Page: Caribbean Indigeneity

What is Caribbean Indigeneity? I considered classifying this project as Pre-Columbian Indigenous Caribbean Peoples but seemed too restrictive. It also perpetuates the notion that these Indigenous peoples live strictly in the past. I thought it’d be more interesting and a

Resource Page: Caribbean Indigeneity

What is Caribbean Indigeneity? I considered classifying this project as Pre-Columbian Indigenous Caribbean Peoples but seemed too restrictive. It also perpetuates the notion that these Indigenous peoples live strictly in the past. I thought it’d be more interesting and a

Preliminary Thoughts on “New” Forms of Media, Technology, and Race

Most of us are probably familiar with the 1979 Buggles tune, “Video Killed the Radio Star.” In the synth-heavy and somewhat campy song, the group sings in saccharine yet nostalgia tones about a shift from the experience of radio to

Preliminary Thoughts on “New” Forms of Media, Technology, and Race

Most of us are probably familiar with the 1979 Buggles tune, “Video Killed the Radio Star.” In the synth-heavy and somewhat campy song, the group sings in saccharine yet nostalgia tones about a shift from the experience of radio to

Site Review: Slave Revolt in Jamaica, 1760-1761

I appreciate that this site begins with an acknowledgement—perhaps even a confession—that there is difficulty in representing the complexities of slave revolt cartographically. The question then is: does this site rise to the challenge of these representations or does it

Site Review: Slave Revolt in Jamaica, 1760-1761

I appreciate that this site begins with an acknowledgement—perhaps even a confession—that there is difficulty in representing the complexities of slave revolt cartographically. The question then is: does this site rise to the challenge of these representations or does it

The present absence of women and gender

In the introduction to Antonio Benítez Rojo’s The Repeating Island, I was immediately struck by the jarring image of the Caribbean with a vagina stretched between the continental clamps of the “encomienda of Indians and the slaveholding plantation” and from

The present absence of women and gender

In the introduction to Antonio Benítez Rojo’s The Repeating Island, I was immediately struck by the jarring image of the Caribbean with a vagina stretched between the continental clamps of the “encomienda of Indians and the slaveholding plantation” and from

The Internet and Diasporic Experience

The internet is a space of wildly shifting scales—from the private message (between you, me, and the NSA) to the seemingly all-encompassing google search. Or from the tweet to the unending twitter feed. Nicholas Negroponte captures this simultaneity of scales

The Internet and Diasporic Experience

The internet is a space of wildly shifting scales—from the private message (between you, me, and the NSA) to the seemingly all-encompassing google search. Or from the tweet to the unending twitter feed. Nicholas Negroponte captures this simultaneity of scales